emergency

Head ER Nurse Naama Bagrish Receives National Honor for Excellence

Naama Bagrish, Head Nurse of the Emergency Medicine Department, was recently awarded Yedioth Ahronoth’s Annual National Prize for Outstanding Worker in the field of Services.

Naama has more than 20 years of Emergency Room experience and manages a staff of 80. She begins her workday each morning at 5:50 AM by getting to know each patient in the emergency room and their specific needs. Naama shared, “As a nurse, I feel a sense of mission. Working in the ER is very fulfilling. I like the fast pace, the diversity of the patients and the staff. I like figuring out what is happening with each patient and providing each patient and their family with what they need.”

“Naama instills in her staff the vision of Nursing Management at Shaare Zedek,” the newspaper wrote, “To be professional and human and to stay close to the patient…Pleasant and lovely, she agreeably and modestly helps with everything and constantly emphasizes that an excellent manager cannot succeed without an excellent staff.”

At the award ceremony, President Ruvi Rivlin quoted Martin Luther King, “If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as a Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music or Shakespeare wrote poetry…” President Rivlin shared, “Striving for excellence…is the desire to do as much as possible, to innovate, to create, develop, contribute to raise the bar and to set an example…”

Photos by Ohad Tzveigenberg/Yediot Aharonoth

 This item appeared in the Summer 2016 edition of Heartbeat, the bi-annual publication of The American Committee for Shaare Zedek Medical Center. To join our mailing list please send your email and address to national@acsz.org.

By |July 28th, 2016|Announcements, Heartbeat|Comments Off on Head ER Nurse Naama Bagrish Receives National Honor for Excellence|

Treating Terror Victims At Shaare Zedek

On hundreds of occasions since August, ambulance crews have alerted the emergency room staff at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem: a victim of a terrorist attack is on the way in.

The clock begins ticking and the Shock and Trauma Unit in the Weinstock Family Department of Emergency Medicine on the Fanya Gottesfeld Heller Floor begins to marshal its resources. In minutes, all necessary equipment and supplies are at the ready including units of blood and blood products for transfusion, and a team of doctors, nurses and other staff —  who vary according to the nature of the incoming patient’s injuries — are on hand, waiting for the ambulance.

Tragically, this scene has been replayed at Shaare Zedek more than 250 times in recent months, as of this writing. The victims of stabbings, shootings and deliberate vehicle rammings have included men, women and children — soldiers, expectant mothers, sabras and recent olim.

Politics are left outside the Hospital’s doors.

“We have Arab doctors treating Jewish patients, and in the next bed, Jewish doctors treating Arabs, maybe attackers,” explained Dr. Ofer Merin, a cardio-thoracic surgeon who is deputy director-general of Shaare Zedek and executive director of the Trauma Unit. “I never try to match an Arab physician to an Arab patient, or a Jewish physician to a Jewish patient, even though language makes it easier. It would be like saying: ‘OK, you’re an Arab, you treat the terrorist.’ No. If someone is shot and comes in, he is treated the same as anyone else who is shot.”

“There are six beds in the Trauma Unit. In bed number one you might find a lady injured by a terrorist; in bed number two could be a child injured by a terrorist; and more >

By |February 18th, 2016|News|Comments Off on Treating Terror Victims At Shaare Zedek|